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Investigating the Meridians and their Origins


In the Unfolding the Meridians Workshop on Saturday June 5, 2021, we began to explore the mystery of the meridians. Incorporating lecture with very simple movement, we investigated the development of the embryo and the theory that the pathways for the 12 organ meridians have a correlation to the development of our bodies and primitive organs in embryo.


Qi gong uses the meridians to help circulate qi through the body and activates acupuncture points though massage or movement.


There is much to discover here and we will continue with another workshop on July 11, 2021: Moving with the Meridians which will help us make the connection to some of our qigong forms and the system of pathways.


So how, when and where were these channels discovered? It is very difficult to say, but in 1991 an unfortunate soul was found in the Swiss Alps who was 5200 years old. He had tattoos and markings on his body that strikingly corresponded to acupuncture points. It was commonly thought that the technique of acupuncture originated during the Han Dynasty around 200 BC, but scientists believe that the use of these arts may have their origins as far back as the Iceage or even further. We can't assume that Europe was the only location where these arts existed, but there is archeological proof that the origin of these techniques was not exclusive to Asia.


Certainly climate change is taking its toll on our bodies just as it did Ötzi (the name given to this Iceage man). He was found to have a variety of ailments including arthritis perhaps due to Lyme disease. Humanity's resilience to great change was perhaps aided by these healing arts and no doubt it will continue to help all of us into the future.


Sources: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/09/5000-year-old-iceman-may-have-benefited-sophisticated-health-care-system


https://www.si.edu/stories/ancient-ink-iceman-otzi-has-worlds-oldest-tattoos#:~:text=The%20debate%20about%20the%20world's,legs%2C%20lower%20back%20and%20torso


Photo: Ming Dynasty Bronze Statue, National Museum of China, WikiMedia Commons.


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